10 Best Tennis Shoes For Diabetics

Updated on: October 2022

Best Tennis Shoes For Diabetics in 2022


Skechers Sport Men's Energy Afterburn Lace-Up Sneaker,White/Navy,10 XW US

Skechers Sport Men's Energy Afterburn Lace-Up Sneaker,White/Navy,10 XW US
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2022
  • 1.5 inches heel
  • Soft fabric shoe lining

CASMAG Women's Walking Outdoor Jogging Cross Trainer Running Shoe Walking Shoes Red 8.5 M US

CASMAG Women's Walking Outdoor Jogging Cross Trainer Running Shoe Walking Shoes Red 8.5 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2022
  • Synthetic sole
  • Newly developed upper with holes features, it will feel extreme breathable with your feet
  • Shoes tongue with integrated collar offer exceptional fit and all-day comfort in a sleek, low cut silhouette.
  • Flexible rubber sole with air cushion which offer for stability and maximum moving
  • This style shoes is designed for casual activities like walking,shopping etc. let your feet comfort all day

New Balance Men's 608v5 Casual Comfort Cross Trainer Shoe, White/Navy, 9.5 XW US

New Balance Men's 608v5 Casual Comfort Cross Trainer Shoe, White/Navy, 9.5 XW US
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2022
  • Dual Density Collar Foam
  • Injection Molded EVA
  • Internal Shank
  • PU insert

Skechers Sport Women's D'lites Bright Sky Fashion Sneaker, White/Silver, 10 W US

Skechers Sport Women's D'lites Bright Sky Fashion Sneaker, White/Silver, 10 W US
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2022
  • Array

Skechers for Work Men's Flex Advantage Bendon Work Shoe, Black, 13 D(M) US

Skechers for Work Men's Flex Advantage Bendon Work Shoe, Black, 13 D(M) US
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2022
  • Array

ASICS Men's Gel-Venture 7 (4E) Shoes, 12XW, Electric Blue/Sheet Rock

ASICS Men's Gel-Venture 7 (4E) Shoes, 12XW, Electric Blue/Sheet Rock
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2022
  • Rearfoot GEL technology cushioning system - Attenuates shock during impact phase and allows for a smooth transition to midstance.
  • Removable Sockliner - A sockliner which can be removed to accommodate a medical orthotic.
  • AHAR Outsole - Acronym for ASICS High Abrasion Rubber. Placed in critical areas of the outsole for exceptional durability.
  • Trail Specific Outsole - Reversed lugs provide uphill and downhill traction on all types of terrain.

Dr. Scholl's - Men's Brisk Light Weight Dual Strap Sneaker, Wide Width (12 Wide, Black)

Dr. Scholl's - Men's Brisk Light Weight Dual Strap Sneaker, Wide Width (12 Wide, Black)
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2022
  • Leather and Man Made Upper
  • Dual Strap Closures
  • Air-Pillow Gel Insoles
  • LIght Weight Walking Shoes

Skechers Sport Men's Afterburn Strike Memory Foam Velcro Sneaker, Black, 11 4E US

Skechers Sport Men's Afterburn Strike Memory Foam Velcro Sneaker, Black, 11 4E US
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2022
  • Dual-strap sneaker featuring lugged outsole and padded tongue and collar
  • Perforated hook-and-loop straps at vamp

Reebok Men's Club Memt Fashion Sneaker, White/Collegiate Navy, 11.5 M US

Reebok Men's Club Memt Fashion Sneaker, White/Collegiate Navy, 11.5 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2022
  • DURABLE AND LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIAL: These classic sneakers feature soft leather upper with toe-box perforations for comfort and ventilation; Stitched overlays add to the clean
  • TRENDY AND FASHIONABLE: These stylish kicks are engineered for lasting comfort and style
  • REMOVABLE SOCKLINER INSERT: This footwear features Memory Tech sockliner for a soft first feel and added cushion for an even more personalized fit
  • COMFORTABLE AND STURDY DESIGN: Low-cut design for an increased ankles mobility so keeps you moving all day long
  • HIGH-PERFORMANCE CASUAL SHOES: Ideal for long walks, running and hiking

Skechers Men's AFTER BURN M.FIT Memory Foam Lace-Up Sneaker, Pebble/Black/Pebble, 12 M US

Skechers Men's AFTER BURN M.FIT Memory Foam Lace-Up Sneaker, Pebble/Black/Pebble, 12 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2022
  • Lace-up sneaker featuring mesh upper with supportive overlays and padded collar
  • Cushioned mesh tongue
  • Memory Foam Insole

How to Have a Type 1 Diabetic Child in Your Classroom, but Not in Your Care

Even if you're not responsible for the medical care of a child with diabetes -- because the child has a parent watching over him, an aide assisting him, or a nurse he's in the care of -- you will want to know a little bit about his diabetes.

Here's some do's and don'ts that will help you ensure the child with diabetes can fully participate in group activities and the group can continue seamlessly in its plans.

1. Do ask before the child enters the room what provisions need to be made and what you might be expected to do.

2. If you don't feel comfortable with a task or a role, do work with the caregiver of the child until you become comfortable or until another arrangement can be made. If the child is not in your care, you won't be asked to deliver insulin. But you may be asked to be one of several sets of eyes looking for "lows" or "highs" in the child's aspect or behavior. If you don't understand what this entails, ask for details until you do.

3. Do keep an eye out. The main hazard for a child with diabetes, one that never leaves her side any minute of the day, is the danger of a "low". A low is when the child has had more insulin delivered into her system than her body needed. Insulin levels need to match blood sugar levels. Too little insulin or too many carbohydrates, and a child will go "high" -- meaning her blood sugar level will rise. Too much insulin or too few carbohydrates, and her blood sugar level will drop too low. A dangerous low means the brain and nervous system go without fuel, the child loses consciousness and may have seizures or other serious problems. Lows rarely do occur, but lows can occur any time. But most kids will show an impending low ahead of time, if you're on the lookout. A child who is suddenly very hungry or tired, lies down to sleep unexpectedly, looks pale or shaky, suddenly cries or becomes irrational, is using a brain that is being deprived of energy. Some kids are able to identify when they are going low, others aren't. Never, never, never disregard or delay your attention for a kid who says she is going low -- you might have less than a minute to get some carbohydrates in her before consciousness is lost.

4. Don't hover. That's hard, considering #3. But it's important for the diabetic child, for the other children, and for yourself that you don't treat the child as if he is a bomb waiting to go off. Even in the case of a bad low, there are options for treatment, and since the risk from a low is fairly perpetual watching a child like a hawk will eventually burn out even the most diligent caregiver. Just don't let a kid wander off alone, pay attention to if he looks or acts differently, listen to him or other children if they try to alert you to a problem, and then try to relax. The more you work with the situation, the easier that will become.

5. Do keep highs in mind. If a child has a blood sugar level that is too high, her brain, nervous system and eyes are flooded with glucose. The high fairly literally gets on her nerves. Some kids have a hard time with cognition or learning with a high; some are a little more abrasive or aggressive; some are more prone to emotionality. If a child is behaving very out of character, consider checking for a high before applying a disciplinary consequence. Diabetic kids can be just plain badly behaved, too -- and appropriate discipline needs to be applied to their behavior. But just as you wouldn't treat bad behavior in a child with a high fever the same as you would if he were feeling fine (you'd give him a fever reducer and decide about further action from there), you should recognize and find someone to test and treat for the high before continuing on with determining consequences.

6. Do have fast acting carbohydrates available in the case of a low -- within a few steps or on your person. In an emergency you don't want to be traipsing to the cafeteria or unlocking a snack cabinet. Juices or glucose tablets work well. If you suspect a serious low but testing is delayed, it's all right to err on the side of giving a few fast carbs. Never try to feed a child who has lost consciousness, that could lead to choking or aspiration.

7. Do consider training on how to use glucagon. Glucagon is not a sugar, it's a hormone that, when injected, prompts the diabetic person's liver to dump its stored sugar into the bloodstream and rescue a kid from a low. There's a big, fat, hairy needle involved, but injecting the hormone is not difficult and you can't overdose a kid on glucagon (just make sure to turn the child on her side in case she is sick as she recovers). Glucagon can revive a person who has lost consciousness from a low, so even if you never intend to use it you will feel less anxiety about diabetes if you know how to operate this safety net. Never use glucagon this way on a conscious person.

8. Do ask the child himself what his preferences are, when appropriate, if the caregiver says the child is all right with it. Do not address diabetes directly with the child if the caregiver indicates he wants to keep his diabetes private. Even as a child, he has that right. Never, ever share personal information about a child's diabetes with another child or adult unless you've been specifically asked to do so by the child and his caregiver. Some kids don't want peers to know about diabetes; others are eager to share info to dispel misunderstanding. Each kid is different and each should have her own choice.

9. Do not deny food to a child with diabetes. Do not, however, feed a diabetic child any food that his caregiver does not know he is eating. Most foods have carbohydrates, and for a Type 1 diabetic even one gram of carbohydrates needs matching insulin injected or pumped in. Diabetic kids can eat anything anyone else can, but it has to be dosed for in the proper amount and time. Give the person dosing ample warning and accurate information about what the kid will be eating and when. Don't delay a snack if a child has been given insulin, you'll cause an emergency.

10. Never remove a child from the proximity of the adult who is caring for her. If you don't know how to test blood sugar levels and inject insulin, or have not been given permission to do so, the child must always be in reach of someone who can. Some older children are responsible largely for their own care, but if the child is not near an adult who is managing her diabetes, then you need more and very specific instruction. Kids may be able to do much themselves, but even adult Type 1s need help sometimes. If you're not qualified to help, become qualified or make sure an adult who is qualified is present.

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