3 Best Tennis Shoes For Massage Therapist

Updated on: September 2022

Best Tennis Shoes For Massage Therapist in 2022


AKK Womens Athletic Walking Shoes - Memory Foam Lightweight Tennis Sports Shoes Gym Jogging Slip On Running Sneakers Dark-Pink

AKK Womens Athletic Walking Shoes - Memory Foam Lightweight Tennis Sports Shoes Gym Jogging Slip On Running Sneakers Dark-Pink
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2022

Nike Women's Flex Trainer 7 Running Shoe, Black/Metallic Silver - Anthracite - White, 7.5 Wide US

Nike Women's Flex Trainer 7 Running Shoe, Black/Metallic Silver - Anthracite - White, 7.5 Wide US
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2022
  • Mesh upper provides lightweight breathability
  • Traction pattern allows for flexible grip in every direction
  • Padded sandwich mesh tongue provides ventilation and helps reduce lace pressure on top of the foot
  • Injected unit sole (IU) material provides lightweight, flexible cushioning. It's durable enough to double as the outsole, dramatically reducing weight

Sport2People Premium Massage Ball - Set of 2 Lacrosse Balls for Trigger Point Treatment and Plantar Fasciitis Pain Relief - Therapy Ball for Deep Tissue Massage and Myofascial Release

Sport2People Premium Massage Ball - Set of 2 Lacrosse Balls for Trigger Point Treatment and Plantar Fasciitis Pain Relief - Therapy Ball for Deep Tissue Massage and Myofascial Release
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2022
  • ELIMINATE STRESS AND IMPROVE YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM with our trigger point massager! Now you can enjoy a body massage in the comfort of your own home. Release tension in your muscles and tissues, decrease pain, stimulate circulation and relax.
  • GET DEEP MASSAGE EFFECT WITH LACROSSE BALL. Soft and pleasant to touch. Great alternative to foam roller or tennis ball that cannot get so deep into the muscle like these balls do. 2.5 inches in diameter and 5.3 oz in weight each. Set of 2 balls.
  • NO MORE TENSION IN YOUR BACK or SORE FEET AFTER LONG WALKS. Simply place the balls to a problem area, lay on them and roll up and down. Not so firm that you cannot handle the pressure when laying on them. Easy portable with free mesh bag.
  • STURDY & DURABLE, HIGH QUALITY 100% NATURAL RUBBER that provides great grip so they don't roll away and aren't slippery. Our yoga ball massager can also help to keep muscles and connective tissues well hydrated. Also great for lacrosse practice.
  • EXPERIENCE A FULL MUSCLE AND BODY RELIEF WITH NO RISK. Perfect for a self-trigger point therapy massage of the piriformis muscle, myofascial release, and reflexology. Combine them with our SPIKY BALLS for even greater impact.

Massage Therapy: An Easy Career?

Since massage therapy requires certification in most states rather than a degree, it seems like an easy and even relaxing alternative to a normal job to some. However, there's more to the profession of massage therapy than rubbing oil on people.

But as a former massage therapy student, I can tell you there are a few downsides to massage therapy as a job. Here's a bit to chew on before you throw yourself into massage school.

1. According to my former teacher, "a massage therapist should do, at maximum, five one-hour massages a day. They should usually work about 25 hours a week." Sounds pretty great, doesn't it? But it's not a five hour work day. That's only the hours a massage therapist gets paid for. If you're employed by a business, then you'll have a lot of in between time, as well as possibly time simply sitting around waiting for a client. It will usually add up to the usual 40-hour workweek.

If you're self-employed, as are around 60% of massage therapists, then you've got to put in even more hours, since you have to handle the paperwork, the money, the advertising, and the scheduling.

2. Not every massage client is going to have a beautiful body. You're going to have wrinkly, aged people, people with horrible scars, and people who just plain smell bad. You're going to have to be willing to extensively touch obese and pimply people. I've had several fellow students who balked once they realized that some of their clients weren't going to be appealing to touch.

3. It is very physically demanding, though it depends a bit on your type of massage therapy. Shiatsu or cranio-sacral therapy is gentler than deep tissue or Swedish massage. You're going to need a lot of stamina and muscle tone to be able to keep at it as a career.

4. School is not a walk among the tulips, either. You have to know a significant number of the 600 muscles of the human body; you don't have to know merely names and location, but also what they do and which way the fibers run. You must typically take a significant number of anatomy and physiology courses, and if you're not the type of person who memorizes well, it will be a challenge.

Secondly, much of the learning is done visually. The massage instructor will typically show the massage techniques in a hands-on fashion, or it will be shown on a screen. If you don't learn visually or through hands-on, you're going to have a rough time.

None of this is to say that massage therapy is bad. I know many massage therapists who love their job. It's simply an honest look at reasons it may not work for you. If you love the reward of making people feel better, if you get a good feeling from an honest days' work, and if you have an accepting quality towards people, then you're going to love it.

As an easy alternative to getting a real job, though? You can throw that out the window.

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