10 Best Tennis Shoes For Support And Comfort

Updated on: September 2022

Best Tennis Shoes For Support And Comfort in 2022


New Balance Men's 608v5 Casual Comfort Cross Trainer Shoe, White/Navy, 11.5 M US

New Balance Men's 608v5 Casual Comfort Cross Trainer Shoe, White/Navy, 11.5 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2022
  • Dual Density Collar Foam
  • Injection Molded EVA
  • Internal Shank
  • PU insert

Under Armour Men's Charged Assert 8 Running Shoe, Black (001)/White, 12

Under Armour Men's Charged Assert 8 Running Shoe, Black (001)/White, 12
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2022
  • 4E Sizing built to better fit athletes with extra wide feet
  • NEUTRAL: For runners who need a balance of flexibility & cushioning
  • Lightweight mesh upper with 3 color digital print delivers complete breathability
  • Durable leather overlays for stability & that locks in your midfoot
  • EVA sockliner provides soft, step in comfort

Skechers womens D'LITES ME TIME Memory Foam Lace-up Sneaker,Grey/White,7.5 M US

Skechers womens D'LITES ME TIME Memory Foam Lace-up Sneaker,Grey/White,7.5 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2022
  • Array

Skechers Sport Women's D'lites Bright Sky Fashion Sneaker, White/Silver, 8.5 W US

Skechers Sport Women's D'lites Bright Sky Fashion Sneaker, White/Silver, 8.5 W US
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2022
  • Array

CLARKS Women's Sillian Bella Mary Jane Flat, Black Synthetic, 7.5 M US

CLARKS Women's Sillian Bella Mary Jane Flat, Black Synthetic, 7.5 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2022
  • Cloud steppers
  • Cushion soft
  • Heel height approximate 1.35 inch
  • Ortholite foot bed

ASICS Women's Gel-Contend 5 Running Shoes, 8M, Black/ICE Mint

ASICS Women's Gel-Contend 5 Running Shoes, 8M, Black/ICE Mint
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2022
  • AmpliFoam Midsole - Engineered to maintain durability at softer densities, providing better flexibility, comfort, and platform adaptability ideal for natural running.
  • Rearfoot GEL technology cushioning system - Attenuates shock during impact phase and allows for a smooth transition to midstance.
  • Ortholite Sockliner - Moisture management (Ortholite is a registered trademark of ATP Manufacturing LLC).

Skechers Performance Women's Go Walk 4 Pursuit Walking Shoe, Black - 8.5 B(M) US

Skechers Performance Women's Go Walk 4 Pursuit Walking Shoe, Black - 8.5 B(M) US
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2022
  • Radically lightweight. Stabilizing heel fabric overlay panels. Side s-logo. 1.25 inch heel
  • Innovative and highly responsive 5GEN midsole cushioning
  • New Goga Max high rebound footbed energizes every step
  • Soft mesh upper and virtually seamless construction for comfortable fit
  • Bamboo lined foot bed for anti-bacterial odor control
  • Tapering midfoot design for improved arch support

New Balance Men's 520v5 Cushioning Running Shoe, Lead/Light Aluminum/Black, 10.5 4E US

New Balance Men's 520v5 Cushioning Running Shoe, Lead/Light Aluminum/Black, 10.5 4E US
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2022
  • Injection Molded EVA
  • Data Inspired Upper Design
  • Rubber Outsole
  • NB Response 1.0 Performance Insert
  • Synthetic/Mesh Upper with Comfort Collar

Clarks Women's Ashland Lane Q Loafer, Dark tan Leather, 090 M US

Clarks Women's Ashland Lane Q Loafer, Dark tan Leather, 090 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2022
  • Heel Height 1.29 inches
  • Ortholite footbed
  • Flexible Rubber outsole
  • Full Grain Leather

Skechers Men's Max Cushioning Premier Vantage-Performance Walking & Running Shoe Sneaker, Black/Charcoal, 7 M US

Skechers Men's Max Cushioning Premier Vantage-Performance Walking & Running Shoe Sneaker, Black/Charcoal, 7 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2022
  • Breathable, engineered mesh upper provides a snug and sock-like fit
  • Microfiber, padded tongue for added comfort
  • Air Cooled Goga Mat technology insole for high-rebound cushioning and comfort
  • Rubber Contact points for durability and traction
  • Articulated midsole provides flexibility
  • closure type: lace-up

How to Hit a Forehand in Tennis

The following how-to guide provides a step-by-step of how to hit a forehand shot like the professionals. These simple tips should help teach the novice player proper technique or help experienced players refresh what they already know.

Step 1- Pivot and Shoulder Turn-

From Ready position, which means that feet are pointing foreward, parallel with shoulders, and knees bent, pivot with you outside foot/your dominant foot and transfer weight to that foot. This foot (right foot for righties and left for lefties) should be flat and loaded up with weight. With the less dominant foot, turn the foot and raise it so that you are on the ball of your foot. By opening hips during the pivot, the player enables himself to bring the shoulders around completely so that the racket moves back for a proper forehand.

Step 2- Take Back The Racket-

Once the player has made a proper pivot and shoulder turn, he is ready to take back the racket. During the Pivot and Shoulder Turn, most players hold the racket firmly with their dominant hand and support it with the less dominant hand. When taking the racket back, the player brings the racket to about shoulder height and directly in line with the shoulder. In other words, the opponent should not be able to see the dominant arm when looking across the court but should be able to see the racket pointed up. During this motion, the player releases the supporting hand. Do not let the supporting hand drop down. Instead, the supporting hand should come up to shoulder height and extend in front of the body. This arm will be completely visible to the opponent.

Step 3- Swing to Contact-

Now that the player has pivoted, turned the shoulder, and taken the racket back, he is ready to swing through to contact. First, the player will need to push off the dominant foot and raise the heel on that foot. When doing this, the non-dominant foot, which formerly had a raised heel, will drop flat to the ground. After completing this footwork, the player will be prepared to generate considerable force with the lower body while swinging. To swing to contact, the player will need to first bring the head of the racket down behind the body before swinging forth. A common mistake beginning tennis players make is bringing the racket directly from above the shoulders to contact. Without bringing the racket down first, the player loses control over how far and where the ball will fly. A tip to remember is that swinging to contact is much like tracing a "C" with the racket before making contact (with a flat racket face) a little in front of the body.

Step 4-Follow Through-

From the contact point, the player arrives at the last-but certainly not least important-step of the forehand swing. To follow through, the player extends the arm out in the direction that he is hitting the tennis ball and across the body. While bringing the arm across the body, the player will rotate the hand toward him. A helpful analogy to remember for this motion involves looking at a wristwatch. The rotation of the hand should be such that the player appears as though he is checking the time on his wristwatch. Taking this action will give the player an ability to generate spin that he would be unable to do otherwise. After the racket reaches the completion of the follow through, the player should return it to the supporting hand and prepare for the next swing.

As with any sport, tennis requires concentration and repetition. Do not expect to be playing on the ATP immediately. Be patient with the knowledge that learning a proper forehand is more than just knowing the steps. It requires practice and the development of muscle memory. Once you do practice and perfect this forehand, you will be ready to learn the backhand.

Works Consulted:

www.rogerfederer.com

www.rafaelnadal.com

www.atpworldtour.comwww.fuzzyyellowballs.com

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