10 Best Tennis Shoes For Training

Updated on: September 2022

Best Tennis Shoes For Training in 2022


New Balance Men's MX623v3 Casual Comfort Training Shoe, White/Navy, 10.5 W US

New Balance Men's MX623v3 Casual Comfort Training Shoe,  White/Navy, 10.5 W US
BESTSELLER NO. 1 in 2022
  • Cross training shoe with suede upper featuring injection molded EVA midsole and non marking outsole
  • Abzorb heel

Axcone Mens Running Tennis Shoes Soft Insole Casual Walking Athletic Training Sports Jogging Sneakers 8995rd44 Red

Axcone Mens Running Tennis Shoes Soft Insole Casual Walking Athletic Training Sports Jogging Sneakers 8995rd44 Red
BESTSELLER NO. 2 in 2022
  • 【Good for holiday present/birthday gift/Gift wrapping available】
  • 【Designed specifically for the American people.Good air cushion feedback. Making it popular with men who love sports】
  • 【QUALITY AFTER-SALES SERVICE 】:90 DAYS 100% MONEY BACK GUARANTEE.We are committed to satisfy every customer, if there are any quality problems, just send it back, we will offer a full refund.
  • 【SIZE SUGGESTION】: width is medium to wide. Half size up is recommended for extra wide feet.
  • 【Lightweight】: Fashion net mesh upper for ultra-lightweight support and breathability can maximizes the upper surface, let your foot always keeps dry and cool.

New Balance Women's FuelCore Nergize v1 FuelCore Training Shoe, Light Grey, 7.5 B US

New Balance Women's FuelCore Nergize v1 FuelCore Training Shoe, Light Grey, 7.5 B US
BESTSELLER NO. 3 in 2022
  • REVlite midsole foam
  • NB Memory Sole Comfort insert
  • Removable insert. Features synthetic upper
  • Slip on upper with additional lace up support

Under Armour Women's Charged Assert 8 Running Shoe, Black (001)/White

Under Armour Women's Charged Assert 8 Running Shoe, Black (001)/White
BESTSELLER NO. 4 in 2022
  • NEUTRAL: For runners who need a balance of flexibility & cushioning
  • Lightweight mesh upper with 3 color digital print delivers complete breathability
  • Durable leather overlays for stability & that locks in your midfoot
  • EVA sockliner provides soft, step in comfort
  • Charged Cushioning midsole uses compression molded foam for even greater responsiveness & durability, providing optimal cushioning & energy return

Skechers Men's AFTER BURN M.FIT Memory Foam Lace-Up Sneaker, Brown/Taupe, 9.5 M US

Skechers Men's AFTER BURN M.FIT Memory Foam Lace-Up Sneaker, Brown/Taupe, 9.5 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 5 in 2022
  • Lace-up sneaker featuring mesh upper with supportive overlays and padded collar
  • Cushioned mesh tongue
  • Memory Foam Insole

DADAWEN Women's White Cheerleading Shoe Fitness Training Shoes Dance Shoes Tennis Sneakers Cheer Shoes for Girls White US Size 8/EU Size 40

DADAWEN Women's White Cheerleading Shoe Fitness Training Shoes Dance Shoes Tennis Sneakers Cheer Shoes for Girls White US Size 8/EU Size 40
BESTSELLER NO. 6 in 2022
  • Friendly Reminder: Please ignore Tag US/EU/JAP Size,Please according to Amazon US size/Foot Length choice correct size.Thank you in advance
  • Low-profile design/synthetic leather upper and mesh tongue,secure fit that adjust to arch height
  • Integrated lacing system,breathable and comfortable Lining,let the foot bent more comfortable
  • Flexible, non-slip, Lightweight soles,exercise is more comfortable and sport without restriction
  • Suitable for various occasions: cheerleading, gym dance, walking, shopping, work, running, fitness...

PUMA Women's Riaze Prowl Sneaker, White Silver, 8.5 M US

PUMA Women's Riaze Prowl Sneaker, White Silver, 8.5 M US
BESTSELLER NO. 7 in 2022
  • Run-train Performance Sneaker
  • Cell
  • closure type: lace-up

ASICS Women's Gel-Venture 7 Running Shoes, 9M, Blue Expanse/Heritage Blue

ASICS Women's Gel-Venture 7 Running Shoes, 9M, Blue Expanse/Heritage Blue
BESTSELLER NO. 8 in 2022
  • Rearfoot GEL technology cushioning system - Attenuates shock during impact phase and allows for a smooth transition to midstance.
  • Ortholite Sockliner - Moisture management (Ortholite is a registered trademark of ATP Manufacturing LLC).

NIKE Women's in-Season TR 8 Training Shoe, Gunsmoke/White-atmosphere Grey, 8.5

NIKE Women's in-Season TR 8 Training Shoe, Gunsmoke/White-atmosphere Grey, 8.5
BESTSELLER NO. 9 in 2022

NOBULL Women's Training Shoes and Styles (9, Black White)

NOBULL Women's Training Shoes and Styles (9, Black White)
BESTSELLER NO. 10 in 2022
  • Run, climb, slide, grind, lift....these kicks have you covered. Lightweight, breathable and flexible protection that moves the way you do. Like a ninja.
  • The upper of the Trainer features a seamless one-piece construction of SuperFabric, an extremely durable, breathable and abrasion resistant material.
  • The SuperFabric guard plates are applied on a highly flexible mesh base layer, creating a 360 degree shield from zombies, rope climbs, and excuses.
  • The outsole lug pattern was designed for multi-environment usage, allowing for an easy transition between inside and outside with the right blend of flexibility, traction and support.
  • High carbon lateral and medial guards for added protection on sidewalls.

Mind Sight: Whatever Happened to Donald Young?

Donald Young was a phenomenal junior tennis player. But since he became professional, he has been stuck in mediocrity.
Also published on:

By the age of 17, Donald Young was regarded by many as the future of American tennis.

Young had won the Junior Australian Open title in 2005 at 15, the U.S. Junior National Championship in 2020 and the Junior Wimbledon title in 2020. When he won the Junior Australian open, he became the youngest junior ever to be ranked number 1. Young also won the U.S. Open Junior doubles title with Alex Clayton, and he was also the first American to win the Junior Australian Open title and end the year at number 1 since Andy Roddick did it in 2000.

Since then, Young has had a rocky time as a professional tennis player. In his eight years as a pro, he has not won a single ATP tournament. Last year he seemed to be headed in the right direction when he got to the fourth round of the U.S. Open, beating Stanislas Wawrinka and Juan Ignacio Chela on the way. But this year he has disappointed again. He has not won a match since February, getting knocked out in the first round at Monte Carlo, Miami, Morocco, Madrid, Rome and Paris. He has now lost 12 matches in a row, including his most recent first-round loss to Mikhail Youzhny at Wimbledon.

According to Howard Bryant of ESPN, during the match with Youzhny, Young turned to his mother at one point and hissed, "I'm about to boil over! I'm telling you, I'm about to boil over!" He screamed at lines people, flailed around and, according to Bryant, "looked beaten." At another point, after Youzhny hit a winner past him, he yelled, "Every time I get here, I play like a punk!"

How could someone with so much early promise fail to deliver that promise? How could someone with so many early successes not learn how to be successful? How could a young man who had opened so many doors, allow those doors to close? These are the kinds of questions that stir in me as a psychoanalyst as I watch him play now.

Young has been coached by his two parents--his mother, Illona, and father, Donald, Sr.--since he was 3 years old. It was under their tutelage that he achieved the successes in the juniors. It was also under their sway that he began to bump and grind on the professional tour. Sometimes parents can be great coaches. A number of successful players have come from parent-coaches, including Venus and Serena Williams, Chris Evert, Jimmy Connors and Rafael Nadal (whose uncle is like a parent). At other times parents can be less than great coaches.

Like stage mothers, tennis parents can get too involved in their child's career. Such parents tend to be somewhat dictatorial in their approach and to cultivate dependency. The child may flourish under this kind of overinvolved and strict parent-coaching for a while. But eventually a child grows up and needs to establish his own identity and individuality. The over-involved tennis parent cannot let go, and so the child becomes an adult who has not learned to think for himself, to set his own standards, and to build his own confidence.

Parents who clutch their children and aim them toward the stars tend to be narcissistic, and their children are their narcissistic extensions, chosen to fulfill their own frustrated dreams. They have unrealistic expectations and sometimes end up with children who, consciously or unconsciously, rebel. Sometimes their offspring want to be and play as their parents want them to; at other times the pressure is too much and they go into lapses where doubt seems to tug at their strokes like an unruly demon.

One of my patients had a stage mother, and he recalled that whenever he had a crisis of confidence, she would shake her head and say, "Lord knows you were blessed with talent; if only your head were as clear as your talent." His head was not as clear as his talent, my patient complained to me, because she had always set unrealistic goals for him and then been disappointed when he didn't achieve them--a fact that he could never bring up to her.

Young's parents had turn professional at sixteen, perhaps before he was ready to do so. He had just started building confidence as a junior, and then he was rushed in to professional tennis, where he was suddenly matched against superior players who took away that confidence. During his eight years as a professional, his parents have held tightly to the reins.

Patrick McEnroe, the general manager of United States Tennis Association player development, has been trying to get Young away from his parents for the last five years. He and others would like him to train under the auspices of the USTA. However, Young seems to be emotionally bound to his parents, and his parents have had a series of angry disagreements with the USTA over that span. They were quite upset when he was not selected as a wild card to last year's French Open, and Young later tweeted an expletive-laden message about the incident.

"We're certainly not going to reach out to them at this point, because we've done that for five years," said McEnroe, stated in an interview at Wimbledon.

Young's situation brings to mind another tennis player who had similar problems finding herself--Jennifer Capriati. Like Young's parents, Jennifer's father, Stefano, became her first coach and kept tight control of her. She won the Junior French Open at 13 (the youngest ever), followed by the Junior U.S. Open, and then was immediately rushed into professional tennis at the same age. By 17, she was already burned out. After a first-round loss at the U.S. Open, she lost interest in tennis. She started drinking heavily and taking drugs. During this period she was arrested for shoplifting and for possession of marijuana. It was only after Capriati had emotionally separated from her parents, hired her own coach, and found her individuality that she blossomed.

Will Young follow Capriati's path to a comeback? Maybe, maybe not. Let's hope he doesn't have to crash and burn before that happens.

Gerald Schoenewolf, Ph.D. is a licensed psychoanalyst, professor of psychology and author of 20 books. He is also an avid sports fan.

Related Bestselling Lists That You Might Like